Please send in your queries, CV and preferred project titles to students@uqccr.uq.edu.au.

How does ovarian cancer spread?

Type of project: Honours/PhD/MPhil

Supervisor: Professor Greg Rice

Project Description: Dissemination of epithelial ovarian cancer is different from other cancers because, unlike the majority of epithelial cancers, it usually involves local invasion of pelvic and abdominal organs but rarely involves the vasculature (hematogenous). Tumour cells that are released/escape from primary ovarian tumours are shed into the peritoneal cavity where they become a source of disseminated disease. Populations of these malignant cells aggregate and form multicellular spheroids. To date, however, the role and capacity of spheroids in disease progression remains uncertain. The aim of this project is to determine mechanism by which primary ovarian cancer metastasis and way of disrupting this process.

Peptidomic profiling of cancers and the development of point-of-care screening tests

Type of project: Honours/PhD/MPhil

Supervisor: Professor Greg Rice

Project Description: Each year, more than 200,000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer is the 8th most common cancer in women and the 2nd most common type of gynecological cancer in the world In Australia, ~1,500 Australian women are diagnosed each year and ~850 die from this disease. Despite recent progress in chemotherapeutic treatments, the diagnosis of late stage disease is associated with a five-year survival rate of ~30%. In contrast, when ovarian cancer is identified at an early stage, five year survival increases to ~90%. The development of more accurate early detection tests is critia lto achieve long-term mortality reduction. The aim of this project is to identify biomarkers of ovarian cancer using advanced proteomics approaches and develop multivariate index assays (IVDMIAs) to improve diagnostic performance.

Animal models to investigate cancer predisposition and neurodegeneration

Type of project: Honours/PhD/MPhil

Supervisor: Professor Martin Lavin

Project Description: The genes defective in different autosomal recessive ataxias have been disrupted to provide model systems for these disorders. Both mouse and rat models have been generated to investigate cancer predisposition and neurodegeneration. Whole animal studies as well investigations with cells derived from these animals will be employed for characterization.